Sponsored Organizations

STEM Scouts depend on sponsored organizations to host, lead and support Labs. You can play an important part in helping to educate America’s youth, invigorate their curiosity and shape future STEM leaders.

BECOME A SPONSORED ORGANIZATION

STEM Scouts needs Sponsored Organizations, such as companies, private schools, places of worship or civic groups, to help bring STEM Scouts to new groups of students. Sponsored organizations sponsor Labs and recruit male and female leaders and volunteers. Trained leaders and STEP (Short-Term, Experienced Professionals) volunteers work with the Sponsored Organization to create a positive STEM experience.

Sponsored Organizations sponsor Lab units and help organize weekly interactions with STEM professionals and field trips that provide students with an inside look into how STEM skills are used in business. Each Lab has at least five students, with at least two trained adult leaders for every 15 students. Labs meet weekly at a regular time and place. For middle and high school groups, a laboratory is preferred for safety purposes.

The STEM Scouts program is a school-year-long curriculum built to give girls and boys in the 3rd thru 12th grades FUN hands-on experiences with experiments, activities and contact with professionals in the STEM fields. There is no homework, no uniform, no merit badges – just STEM! We incorporate the Scout Oath and Law into the program – the values every parent wants their child to learn. The units (called Labs) meet weekly. The cost of the program is $200 per youth, $25 per adult. This cost covers registration, online portal access, training, training materials, as well as the program materials and equipment shipped directly to the Lab in time for each module. The Elementary school level for 3rd thru 5th grades (called Junior Labs) has 7 modules plus safety modules are 4 weeks in length each; The Middle school level for 6th thru 8th grades (called Technology Labs) has 6 modules plus safety modules, 6 weeks in length each; The High school level for 9th thru 12th grades (called Research Labs) has 6 modules plus safety modules, 6 weeks in length each.

2017-2018 School Year STEM Scouts Program Activities

Junior Labs (Elementary School grades 3-5):

Module-1 Digging Archeology: Scouts will learn how archaeologists work, how amber traps ancient objects, how to mummify something, and what ancient people ate.

  • Meeting-1: The Basics of Archaeology: What is archaeology? Learn about the science and technology behind digging, analyzing, and understanding the past and present.
  • Meeting-2: Prehistoric Amber: What is Amber? Learn how it forms and how it traps insects and other objects from millions of years ago. Scouts will each polish a piece of amber to discover what is inside it and then get to take it home!
  • Meeting-3: Make your own Mummy: Ancient people throughout the world have preserved the bodies of their loved ones through a process called mummification. Mummies, as a result, have become the subject of many movies and books. Test out different mummification methods and see how they work!
  • Meeting-4: Meddling Midden: How do archaeologists figure out what ancient people ate? Find out through cataloging waste and other remains!

 

Module-2 Light & Colors: Light and the absence of light have fascinated people since ancient times. darkness Scouts will learn what light is and delve into many of the key properties of light.

  • Meeting-1: Characteristics of Light: Scouts will learn what light is, how to describe it, and how we see light and color. Scouts will learn that some frequencies of light can be very hot. In addition, they will learn how to use light to identify different materials.
  • Meeting-2: Reflection and Refraction: Scouts will learn how to move light around and change the path of light. They will devise a combination of mirrors to fire a laser and hit a target. Scouts will build a laser light waterfall and discover how fiber opticswork.
  • Meeting-3: Light Scattering and Color Spectrum: Scouts will learn what light scattering is and how important it is in our daily lives. Scouts will learn all about color and how colors work in light. They will even learn why the sky is blue and the sunset is red and how to turn any smartphone into a black light!
  • Meeting-4: Laser Target Shooting: Scouts will use the knowledge they have acquired throughout this module to design and build a laser light maze to get a laser to hit a target.

 

Module-3 Ozobot Games: This Module is based around one of the smallest robots available, the Ozobot! Scouts will be learning how the Ozobot works, and use it in many different ways, including developing a game and programming Ozobot to solve all sorts of puzzles. Scouts will learn the Blockly programming environment (in this case, OzoBlockly), a simplified programming language that is used to interactively control these tiny robots.

  • Meeting-1: OzoBlockly Basic Training: Scouts will learn how to use OzoBlockly, a visual programming tool, to program the Ozobot. They will play several games with the Ozobot and learn the basics of visual programming, movement and rotation, setting LED colors, loading a program onto the Ozobot, and running it.
  • Meeting-2: Build your own Ozobot Game:  Scouts will design their own game for an Ozobot and design and code the program to make the game work.  They will get to play each other’s games.
  • Meeting-3: Robots Across Time: In this activity, Scouts will explore the fascinating history of robotics while traveling through time with help from the power of programming. Using the Ozobot, Scouts will explore programming as they discover how they can get the Ozobot to navigate a timeline of robotics history using a computer program. By the time the Ozobot arrives at the most recent robotic event, Scouts will have learned how to provide programming cues for a robot to recognize, react to and execute.
  • Meeting-4: Ready, Set, Race: Scouts will learn firsthand the need for precision and exactness in programming as they design and execute creative solutions to get the Ozobot from point to point as quickly as possible and without any drawn lines to follow. Scouts will be supplied with time constraints and color codes. Their challenge is to design a course that the Ozobot can complete within the time constraints they are given and while executing three of the color-coded commands

  

Module-4 Magnetism: Let’s Get Sticky Scouts will learn about the world of magnetism and the different types of magnets. They will learn the basics of magnetic fields and how they are related to, and interact with, electric fields. They will learn about different materials and why some materials generate stronger magnetic fields than others.

  • Meeting-1: What is Magnetism and Magnets? Scouts will learn the basics of magnets and magnetism. They will experiment with different kinds of magnets, create a magnet from raw materials and delve in to the differences in materials and strengths of various magnets.
  • Meeting- 2: Build a Motor: Scouts will learn about the interaction of electrical fields and magnetic fields as they build and experiment with a home-made motor that they get to take home with them.
  • Meeting-3: Make an Electro-Magnetic Train: Scouts will go further into how magnetic fields are generated and how electricity in coils generates magnetic fields. They will build an electro-magnetic train demonstrator and run experiments with it.
  • Meeting-4: Fun with Magnetic Fields: Scouts will run through a series of experiments with different strength and types of magnets and observe the actual magnetic fields. They will use different magnetic materials, including ferro fluid.

Module-5 Astronomy:Scouts will explore the field of Astronomy in this module, looking at what Astronomy is all about. They will explore our own Solar System, then travel out to the stars and learn how to characterize them. Finally, they will return to our Solar System, and look at how the Earth, Moon and Sun interact.

  • Meeting-1: Astronomy Treasure Hunt: Scouts will explore the objects in the sky, starting with objects close to earth and extending out to the most distant objects observable from the earth. Scouts will discover and identify fun facts and interesting things among the sky’s treasure. This lab is set up so that it can be done on a computer and also can be enriched with outdoor observations at night, using one’s eyes, binoculars, and/or atelescope.
  • Meeting-2: Solar System: Build and explore a scale model of our solar system.
  • Meeting-3: Stars in the Sky: Scouts will explore the dependence of star brightness on the distance to the star. Scouts will also explore the observable characteristics of stars and their life histories as they relate to the masses of thestars
  • Meeting-4: The Earth, Moon & Sun: Scouts will explore the dynamics of the Earth, Moon and Sun interactions. They will explore solar and lunar eclipses through a model they build and how the Earth’s axial tilt affects seasons and weather.

Module-6 What’s The Matter? This module is all about Matter. Scouts will investigate the three states of matter, the way matter changes from one state to another, and some fun and interesting observable properties in each state.

  • Meeting-1: All about Solids: Scouts will learn how to define a solid and identify its characteristics. They will work with several different kinds of objects to observe and determine the properties ofsolids.
  • Meeting-2: Splish, Splash – what are Liquids: Scouts will learn how to define a liquid, identify its properties and characteristics, and understand how they differ fromsolids.
  • Meeting-3: It’s a Gas!: Scouts will learn how to define a gas, identify its properties and characteristics, and understand how they differ from solids and liquids.
  • Meeting-4: Matter & Change: Scouts will experiment with all three matter states and observe how materials can change from one state to another.

Module-7 Can You Hear Me? What is sound? How does it travel? In this module, Scouts will learn all about sound through a fun series of experiments.

  • Meeting-1: The Nature of Sound – How Sound Travels: Scouts will learn that sound is energy and it comes from vibrating objects. They will use mechanical energy to cause a material to vibrate and produce sounds. They will explore how the sound energy is carried by a wave made up of particles of air which bump into one another as they move alternately back and forth.
  • Meeting-2: Sound Waves – Frequency, Loudness, and Wavelength: Scouts will learn how to determine sound wave frequency, wavelength and how to change loudness. They will learn how resonators work
  • Meeting-3: The Velocity of Sound, Part 1: Scouts will learn that the velocity of sound in air is about 1,100 feet/second when the air temperature is 50˚ F. They will learn how temperature of the air affects the speed of the sound waves.
  • Meeting-4: The Velocity of Sound, Part 2: Scouts will learn how to measure the velocity of sound using a resonating tube, and delve further into velocity (γ), wavelength (λ). and frequency (ƒ)

 

 Technology Lab (Middle School Grades 6-8)

Module-1 Crazy Robot Machines: Scouts will explore the world of automated machines, learning about simple machines, drive trains (motors, gears and how they work together to move machines) and develop a crazy (Rube Goldberg-like) machine and automate it – using VEX Robot kits.

  • Meeting-1: Build a Robot: Scouts will learn the VEX kit and build a motorized base that they will use throughout the Module.
  • Meeting-2: Simple Machines: Scouts will learn the basics of simple machines using the VEX kit to build and test several different machines.
  • Meeting-3: Rube Goldberg Machines: Scouts will learn about crazy machines and build a machine to park a car, out of the simple machines they developed inMeeting-3.
  • Meeting-4: How Robots Move: Scouts will dig deeper into how robots move, delving into gear rations, motors and drive trains.
  • Meeting-5 & 6: Build an Autonomous Machine: Scouts will take the crazy machine they build in meeting 3 and automate it by programming the VEX brain.

 

Module-2 Mobile Apps: Smartphone and tablet Apps are one of the new hot product spaces. Apps are available for games, networking, communicating, and many tools of everyday life. It takes very little resources to create an App, unlike creating physical products. Scouts will learn and use one of the more common methodologies, called “Design Thinking” to conceive, design and build a mobile device app.

  • Meeting-1 Solve a Problem in Your Community: Scouts will be introduced to the five stages of design thinking; Empathize, Define, Ideate, Prototype and Test. In meeting 1, Scouts will focus on the importance of understanding the customer/user perspective in product development. Scouts will then define their own problem they wish to solve in their community and brainstorm mobile application solutions.
  • Meeting-2: Dream Big and Create a Story: Scouts will learn the importance of wire framing and storyboarding. Scouts will sketch a wireframe for each web page and put them together to create the flow of their app. In addition, they will explore the MIT app inventor software and become familiar with how to use it to build their prototype.
  • Meetings-3 & 4: Turn Your thoughts into a Prototype: Scouts will create a working prototype in the MIT App Inventor system using the wireframes and storyboard from Meeting-2
  • Meeting-5: Test, Refine and Test Some More: Scouts will test other Scout’s apps and provide constructive feedback on how they can improve their product. Scouts will use the feedback to improve their own design.
  • Meeting-6: Sell Your Idea: Scouts will also be introduced to, work on, and deliver a presentation to sell theirproduct.

Module-3 How Does Light Work?: Light and the absence of light have fascinated people from ancient history to the present day. In this module, Scouts will learn what light is, and delve into many of the key properties of light.

  • Meeting-1 Characteristics of Light: Scouts will learn what light is, how to describe it, and how we see light and color. Scouts will learn that some frequencies of light can be very hot. In addition, Scouts will learn how to use light to identify different materials.
  • Meeting-2: Reflection & Refraction: Scouts will learn how to move light around and change the path of light. Scouts will devise a combination of mirrors to fire a laser and hit a target. Scouts will build a laser light waterfall and discover how fiber optics works.
  • Meeting-3: Light Scattering & Color Spectrum: Scouts will learn what light scattering is and how important that is in our daily lives. Scouts will learn all about color and how colors work in light. They will even learn why the sky is blue and the sunset is red and how to turn any smartphone into a black light.
  • Meeting-4: Lenses: Scouts will learn all about lenses and how they work to focus light, or disperseit. Scouts will make a telescope, and how to make lasers converge to a single point.
  • Meeting-5: Luminescence & Holography: Scouts will learn how cold, luminescence light, is made and how we use it in our lives. They will explore bioluminescence, chemiluminescence, and electroluminescence. Then, Scouts will learn what a hologram is and make their own holographic projector out of a smartphone.
  • Meeting-6: Capstone Project: Scouts will use all the new knowledge they have acquired throughout this module to design and build a laser light maze game to get a laser to hit a target.

 Module-4 STEM Scouts: Mission to the International Space Station: Scouts will go on a simulated mission to the International Space Station (ISS), where they will learn about life as an astronaut, the marvelous International Space Station, and fascinating experiments with weightlessness!

  • Session 1 – Welcome and Launch! – Welcome to astronaut training. Scouts learn about the rockets and vehicles that carry astronauts to the International Space Station. Then it’s time for a simulated launch followed by docking with the ISS. Scouts work in teams of two to construct and launch paper rockets up to 50 feet high! They measure the altitudes reached by their rockets and modify their designs to reach greater heights. They conclude the activity by writing a post-flight report.
  • Session 2 – Tour the ISS: – Now that they’re on board, Scouts adjust to microgravity, get a guided tour, and settle into their crew quarters. Scouts design and build their own space station modules.
  • Session 3 – Take a look at Earth from Space: – Scouts head over to the Cupola, and enjoy the view of Earth. They learn about the Space Station’s orbit and how astronauts take advantage of it to take stunning photographs of Earth. They review the daily download of newimages.
  • Session 4 – To Taste in Space: – Scouts will learn how an astronaut experienced changes in taste intensity before and during a mission, how reduced gravity affects the human body, and conduct a series of taste experiments to appreciate the different senses which influencetaste.
  • Session 5 – Spacewalk Safety: – Scouts learn about extravehicular activities (EVAs), also known as spacewalks and the technology of the spacesuits that keep astronauts safe in the extreme conditions of space. In two experiments, they test materials engineered for absorbing fluids and protecting against particle impacts.
  •  Session 6 – Return to Earth – Mission Accomplished! – With their ISS mission goals accomplished, it’s time to strap into the Soyuz vehicle and return to Earth. Scouts undertake a challenge to build a shock- absorbing system for a safe landing. They follow the STEM Scouts engineering design process to build, test, and improve a shock-absorbing system out of simple materials.

 

Module-5 War of the Drones:  Scouts will be introduced to the Syma QuadCopter, a simple version of a drone, that they can use to replicate some of the tasks carried out by more advanced unmanned aerial vehicles. They will experiment with the drone in a variety of ways and learn about drone safety regulations and flight planning.  They will plan a race, figure out how to measure velocity and acceleration and then use the drone to do a community service project investigation and prepare a proposal to make some community improvements.

  • Meeting-1: Learn to Fly Safely & Legally: Scouts will learn the basics of piloting a drone from the ground using a remote control. Everything including pre-flight preparation, safety, proper flying conditions, and some of the purposes that drones can be used for will becovered.
  • Meeting-2: Plan and Execute a Flight Plan: Scouts will use what they learn in Meeting-1 to develop a local flight plan and fly it.
  • Meeting-3: Plan a Drone Race: In this Meeting, Scouts will use their creativity and work as teams to design a racing course, come up with race rules, and how to use their drones to see, compute, and control speed and velocity.
  • Meeting-4: Race Day! In this Meeting, Scouts will hold a race day pitting the different Scout Teams against each other.  They will also be accurately determining the speed of thedrones.
  • Meeting-5&6: Community Service Project: In the final two meetings, Scouts will use what they have learned about drones to investigate and develop a plan to spark some meaningful change in the community. Using their flying skills and attention to detail, Scouts will survey the surrounding area from the air and investigate ways they can help improve their community whether it’s by reducing environmental concerns or solving the problems posed by heavy traffic congestion.

 

 Research Lab (High School grades 9-12)

 

Module-1 Robots: Scouts will explore the world of automated machines, learning about simple machines, drive trains (motors, gears and drive systems) and develop a fully functional robot and program it to be autonomous.

    • Meeting-1: Build a first Robot: Scouts will learn the VEX kit and build a motorized base that they will use throughout the Module.

    • Meeting-2: Simple Machines: Scouts will learn the basics of simple machines by building several simple machines using the VEX kit.

    • Meeting-3: How Robots Move: Scouts will dig deeper into how robots move, delving into gear ratios, motors and drive trains.

    • Meeting-4: Autopilot Bot: Scouts will add sensors to their basic robot and learn how sensors provide feedback and help a program control the robot’s actions and movements.

    • Meeting-5 & 6: Programming a Robot with Sensors: Scouts will take learn how to program a robot, then design and build a complete robot with sensors and program it to perform one of several challenges

 

 

Module-2 STEM Scouts: Your Life in Space: Scouts will go on a simulated mission to the International Space Station, where they learn about life as an astronaut, the marvelous International Space Station, and fascinating experiments with weightlessness! Each day, they explore a new topic, using online resources and classroom kits.

  • Session 1 – Welcome and Launch! – Welcome to astronaut training. Scouts learn about the rockets and vehicles that carry astronauts to the International Space Station. Then it’s time for a simulated launch followed by docking with the ISS. Scouts work in teams of two to construct and launch paper rockets up to 50 feet high! They measure the altitudes their rockets reach and modify their designs to reach greater heights. They conclude the activity by writing a post-flight report.

  • Session 2 – Tour the ISS: – Now that they’re on board, Scouts adjust to microgravity, get a guided tour, and settle into their crew quarters. Scouts design and build their own Space Station Modules.

  • Session 3 – Take a look at Earth from Space: – Scouts head over to the Cupola, and enjoy the view of Earth. They learn about the Space Station’s orbit and how astronauts take advantage of it to take stunning photographs of Earth. They review the daily download of new images.

  • Session 4 – To Taste in Space: – Scouts will learn how an astronaut experienced changes in taste intensity before and during a mission, how reduced gravity affects the human body, and conduct a series of taste experiments to appreciate the different senses which influence taste.

  • Session 5 – Spacewalk Safety: – Scouts learn about extravehicular activities (EVAs), also known as spacewalks and the technology of the spacesuits that keep astronauts safe in the extreme conditions of space. In two experiments, they test materials engineered for absorbing fluids and protecting against particle impacts.

  • Session 6 – Return to Earth – Mission Accomplished! – With their ISS mission goals accomplished, it’s time to strap into the Soyuz vehicle and return to Earth. Scouts undertake a challenge to build a shock- absorbing system for a safe landing. They follow the STEM Scouts engineering design process to build, test, and improve a shock-absorbing system out of simple materials.

 

Module-3 Physics of Light & Dark: Light and the absence of light have fascinated people from ancient history to the present day. In this module, Scouts will learn what light is, and delve into many of the key properties of light.

  • Meeting-1 Characteristics of Light: Scouts will learn what light is, how to describe it, and how we see light and color. Scouts will learn that some frequencies of light can be very hot. In addition, Scouts will learn how to use light to identify different materials.

  • Meeting-2: Reflection & Refraction: Scouts will learn how to move light around and change the path of light. Scouts will devise a combination of mirrors to fire a laser and hit a target. Scouts will build a laser light waterfall and discover how fiber optics works.

  • Meeting-3: Light Scattering & Color Spectrum: Scouts will learn what light scattering is and how important that is in our daily lives. Scouts will learn all about color and how colors work in light. They will even learn why the sky is blue and the sunset is red and how to turn any smartphone into a black light

  • Meeting-4: Lenses: Scouts will learn all about lenses and how they work to focus light, or disperse it. Scouts will make a telescope, and how to make lasers converge to a single point.

  • Meeting-5: Luminescence & Holography: Scouts will learn how cold, luminescence light is made and how we use it in our lives. They will explore bioluminescence, chemiluminescence, and electroluminescence. Then, Scouts will learn what a hologram is and make their own holographic projector out of a smartphone.

  • Meeting-6: Capstone Project: Scouts will use all the new knowledge they have acquired throughout this module to design and build a laser light maze game to get a laser to hit a target.

 

Module-4 Inventors/Entrepreneurs: Scouts go through the same processes that are taught to today’s budding entrepreneurs. Based on the Lean Startup Methodology, the Scouts start as Inventors, working as a team to create and explore ideas for inventions. Then, they transition from being an inventor to learning how to be entrepreneurs and develop a business case and plan to bring their invention to market.

   Throughout this module, Scouts will be learning common tools and methodologies     

    that are used by Entrepreneurs to develop their businesses.

  • Meeting-1: Let’s Invent Something!: Scouts will work in a team to come up with a possible invention that solves a real problem. They will identify current issues they see in situations around them that they would like to solve.  They will learn that some of the best inventions and products are those that remove painful issues. This lab stresses team work, and introduces Scouts to successful group decision techniques, while at the same time encouraging creativity

  • Meeting-2: Build the Business Model Canvas: Scouts will take the one problem they decided to pursue in the last meeting and start the process of defining the solution. With this meeting, the Scouts are starting their transition from Inventor to Entrepreneur. They will learn what a Business Model Canvas is and how to use it.

   They will also learn the business terminology that the BMC is based upon.

  • Meeting-3 Update/Refine your Business Model Canvas & Learn about Minimum Viable Products: In the first part of the meeting, the Scouts will share the data they gathered through their interviews during the past week. They will use this data to update and refine their BMC. Then, they will learn what Minimum Viable Products (MVPs) are and how to define them.

  • Meeting-4: Create a Minimum Viable Product (MVP):  Inventors often suffer from the disease of “it has to do everything I thought of right away!” Many great ideas have cratered when the team spends so much time perfecting and adding features to their product/idea that they never get it to market. Scouts will learn what a Minimal Value Product is and how to develop it as a solid product to meet the needs of convincing investors to give them money to pursue their vision and grow their business.

  • Meeting-5: Develop a Proposal/Pitch: This meeting is all about pulling everything together to create and practice your proposal and pitch to the investors. Scouts will need to sell their product/solution case, demonstrate their MVP and convince the investors that they deserve to be funded to proceed. This is NOT a full business case – we are not going into the financial side. The objective of the pitch is to convince people to feel the pain and agree that this is a real problem that needs to be solved, and that this solution is going to be a great solution for the problem identified.

  • Meeting-6: Sell Your Invention: The different Scout teams will each get a chance to present their problem and solution and convince a review team that they have something great that should be developed.

 

Module 6: The Internet of Things with Raspberry Pi: In the late 1980’s, the Internet, or World Wide Web, as we know it today, moved from the world of universities and government to the public. Over nearly four decades, the web has spread to computers around the world, then into phones and other devices. Now, we are seeing everyday household devices getting connected, cars, security systems, and many other devices. Internet connectivity is now being promoted on all sorts of items, from electrical outlets, to smart refrigerators that can track your food consumption and even order replacements from your local grocery store!  This growing market is called the Internet of Things or IoT for short.  In this module, Scouts will learn how to program the Raspberry Pi, a credit card size, common educational programmable computer, learn the Python programming language, and learn how to interact with the IoT in a “smart home” environment.

 

    • Meeting-1: Getting to Know the Raspberry Pi: Scouts will learn about the Raspberry Pi and the different components it has. They will be able to compare the Raspberry Pi to a traditional desktop.

    • Meeting-2: Programming with Python and the Raspberry Pi: Scouts will learn how to enter a Python program and run it. They’ll also learn about various aspects of the Python language while observing how programming can alter and improve efficiency.

    • Meeting-3: Learning to Control GPIO Pins: Scouts will learn how to use the General Purpose Input/Output (GPIO) pins on the Raspberry Pi to interface with electronic components.

    • Meeting-4: Programming GPIO Pins with Python: Scouts will learn how to program the general- purpose input/output pins on the Raspberry Pi using Python to control external devices.

    • Meeting-5:  Smart Home IoT Devices:  Scouts will be using the Raspberry Pi GPIO ports to interface with the sensors. In this activity, Scouts will use them for input as they are collecting data from external sensors to control a light switch and to know when a door opens.

    • Meeting-6: Programming an IoT Device in a Smart Home: Scouts will program the Raspberry Pi to control an IoT device suitable for a smart home.

 

Ready to bring STEM Scouts to your area?

Together, we can spark the curiosity of a new generation of students. Contact us for more information on becoming a Sponsored Organization, download a new lab unit application or for more information, visit our FAQs page.

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Register

Register your Lab.
A. Complete new Lab application.
B. Sign Sponsored Organization annual agreement.
C. Pay a $40 insurance fee.

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Appoint Leaders

A. Identify 3 coed leaders (One STEM professional for middle and high school units).
B. Attend youth protection and leadership training.

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Recruit + Meet

A. Get the word out to students and parents in your area.
B. Hold recruiting events.
C. Meet weekly and have fun.

How Does it Work?

Shape. Tinker. Explore. Make.

The Sponsored Organization establishes the Lab and recruits students and adult volunteers, including both long-term and STEP (Short-Term Experienced Professional) volunteers. The organization includes STEM Scouts in its overall youth and family programs and conducts STEM Scouts according to BSA policies and guidelines. The organization is expected to encourage field trips and summer camp opportunities.

STEM Scouts needs adult volunteers, both with and without experience in STEM fields. The STEM Scouts office provides direction in selecting and approving leaders. Middle and high school Labs require that at least one leader has a STEM background. The Scout Council provides all of the materials and volunteer training needed for a successful Lab. Leaders don’t need all the answers, just an enthusiasm for working with curious, young minds. The council helps with recruiting events, training and resources, staff support, liability insurance and materials rental.

Williams Preparatory Academy, Dallas

Uplift Williams Preparatory School was the first school in Dallas to adopt STEM Scouts! We now have all three STEM Scouts levels at this location!


First Christian Day School, Waxahachie

First Christian Day School has an Elementary School STEM Scouts Lab!


Walnut Hill Elementary School's PTA is a proud supporter of STEM Scouts!


Legacy Preparatory Academy Charter School PTO, Plano

Legacy Preparatory Charter Academies not only have STEM Scouts after school they also host STEM Scouts Day Camp at each campus in the summer!


STEM Gems, Frisco


Jerry Junkins Elementary PTO, Carrollton

STEM Scouts is an active after school program at Jerry Junkins Elementary School!


Lakewood Montessori School

Lakewood Montessori has a very active STEM Scouts program as an after school activity!


Legacy Preparatory Academy - Mesquite

Legacy Preparatory Charter Academies not only have STEM Scouts after school they also host STEM Scouts Day Camp at each campus in the summer!


The Friends of the Denison Library are actively engaging the youth of Denison and surrounding areas with Elementary School and Middle School STEM Scouts labs!


Arthur Kramer Elementary School PTA

Kramer Elementary School joins the STEM Scouts program for school year 2017/18!


Harmony School of Science, Garland


STEM Scouts at a Glance

  • Weekly Labs, monthly field trips, grouped by age
  • Volunteer leaders and short-term, professional volunteers
  • 4- to 6-week learning modules, created by STEM educators
  • Mentoring and publishing opportunities
  • New skills and character development opportunities
  • Virtual badges for achievements
  • Mobile Labs for learning on the go


Download a curriculum brochure

Join the Movement

Whether you're interested in becoming a STEM scout, a volunteer, a leader or a host, we have a place for you. Learn more about open labs in your area.

Find a Lab

Be a Part of History

The Scout Council provides all of the training volunteers need to oversee a successful STEM Lab. Leaders don’t need all the answers, just enthusiasm. Trained leaders and STEP (Short-Term, Experienced Professionals) volunteers work to create a positive, hands-on STEM experience. 

Volunteer with Stem Scouts